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THERAPY

Sample of Changing History

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Expert in Australia EXPERTS

How False Allegations Lose Their Credibility

Alienating parents often implicate themselves when making false allegations. The legal and protective response is frightening, resulting in years of investigation and the targeted parent’s exclusion. Nonetheless, these allegations often fail if they run their course. The legal family violence interventions backfire on the alleging parent. They lack credibility and authenticity when the alleging parent:

Read more: How False Allegations Lose Their Credibility
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PASG

PROVIDE AN ENDORSEMENT

Do you agree with the proposal that parental alienation relational problem be included in DSM-5-TR?  More than 1,000 individuals and organizations have endorsed the proposal.

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PARENTAL ALIENATION

Z62.898    Parental Alienation Relational Problem

We propose that parental alienation be considered a relational problem in the chapter of DSM-5-TR, “Other Conditions That May Be a Focus of Clinical Attention.”

This is the proposed wording for parental alienation relational problem (PARP):

Z62.898    Parental Alienation Relational Problem

Read more: Z62.898    Parental Alienation Relational Problem
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Alienation Borderline Personality Disorder Histrionic Personality NPD (Narcissistic Personality Disorder) PERSONALITY DISORDERS

Adult Children Of Psychopaths, Narcissists And Sociopaths:

Coming from a pathological family, with the psychopath, narcissist or sociopathic parent as the center of the family universe, can create a negativity that says the glass is always empty. We are left to ‘problem solve’ throughout childhood and adolescence in survival mode, while enduring overwhelming amounts of daily abuse. We are not taught to create solution to problems but to avoid them, as this keeps the mask of the pathological parent and family secure.

As adults, through God’s grace, we come to awareness about how sick and pathological our families are. Most often, this awareness occurs through the extremes we experience in a love relationship with a disordered one.

We begin to note that the behaviors exhibited by our partner’s are severe and extreme, whether it’s manipulation, gas lighting, emotional, verbal, physical, sexual, financial or spiritual abuse of any kind, something about their behaviors and our reactions to it, awaken us to the truth about psychopathy, narcissism and sociopathy.

If we are not carrying a Cluster B personality disorder of our own, the hope for awareness, I believe, will increase. This awareness presents an opportunity for validation about our experiences with our pathological parent, family dynamics, roles, etc.

It becomes clearer to us over time, and as we get older and continue to choose partners that are disordered and situations that are highly dramatic and chaotic, including friendships.

Depending upon how intense the relationship, it can take one relationship or several more, each one increasingly more pathological and sick than the last, before we can see the pattern of our own behaviors and choices, clearly, as well as the behavior of our partners and parent/family.

Coming to awareness about our family background after the break up of a romantic relationship, can be shocking to us. As we explore the reasons for the partnered relationship demise, in desperation, we stumble upon information about the disorders. And as we process the relationship, we begin to see that our lives may be full of Cluster B’s, including our own family of origin (FOO).

We find ourselves feeling only slightly validated after reading about the behaviors exclusive to the Cluster B, but there is so much more to sort through on an emotional level for an adult child of psychopaths, narcissists and sociopath. Recognizing the behaviors in our family of origin, we begin to ask questions, see abuse tactics used by the parent and the roles that we and our siblings played and continue to play.

Adult children who are intuitive and empathic, may find that even their siblings are disordered or extremely emotionally troubled in some way. When we dare to confront, on some level, the family dynamic, directly with the pathological parent or with the siblings, we may find ourselves under attack, manipulated, gas lighted, the focus of the family problems from the beginning.

We may see reactions as we confront our parent or other family members while asking questions and trying to ‘correct’ the ‘problems’ that are spontaneous, sudden and extreme. Unprepared for battle in all our pain, anguish and confusion, we are not validated, but find ourselves invalidatedmore.

We have not yet digested that they are incapable of validation, that they too are lacking in conscience and empathy. What we are seeking in safety, or with hope, is anything but safe and can be very dangerous to us. While a survivor might know that something is wrong, that her ex partner is definitely disordered, when it comes to this reality about the family, things are far more enmeshed and skewed, viewing life from the original and distorted pathological lens. . .

Many survivors with pathological parents, come to me upon this discovery in reading my work and connecting the dots, already embroiled in extraordinary amounts of abuse from the parent or family, as they begin to think about no contact and escape. Most have already begun to confront their family members about the family dynamic, some are in such dangerous situations that it’s not possible to do so, yet the confusion and pain is intense for them.

They are beaten down from not only a pathological partner or close friendship, but also from years of exploitation, manipulation and other forms of abuse from family members. Often the pathological parent is on the ‘war path’ with the survivor and has engaged siblings or other family members to activate their roles to an all time high in order to invalidate and silence the perceived threat, the survivor as one about the open the pandora’s box of family abuse and secrets.

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https://theabilitytolove.wordpress.com

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Alienated children Alienation Dr. Craig Childress PARENTAL ALIENATION Parental Alienation PA

Parental Alienation – A Checklist

Use these checklist’s to find out whether your relationship with your child is being damaged by parental alienation by the other parent – or whether you are responsible for parental alienation yourself

  1. Parental Alienation Processes Pathogenic Parenting – Concern Scale- C.A. Childress,Psy.D

  2. The Parenting Practices Rating Scale

  3. THE MIRROR WITHOUT A FACE

 

Badmouthing;

Limiting contact;

Interfering with communication;

Limiting mention and photographs of the targeted parent;

Withdrawal of love/ expressions of anger;

Telling the child that the targeted parent does not love him or her;

Forcing the child to choose;

Creating the impression that the targeted parent is dangerous;

Confiding in the child personal adult and litigation information;

Forcing the child to reject the targeted parent;

Asking the child to spy on the targeted parent;

Asking the child to keep secrets from the targeted parent;

Referring to the targeted parent by their first name;

Referring to a step-parent as mom or dad and encouraging the child to do the same;

Withholding medical, social, academic information from the targeted parent and keeping his/her name off the records;

Changing the child’s name to remove association with the targeted parent; and

Cultivating dependency on self / undermining authority of the targeted parent.

 

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Alienation EXPERTS PARENTAL ALIENATION

Mind Control and Brainwashing of Children

Psychological manipulation: An expert explains parental alienation to “48 Hours”

How can one parent turn a child against the other parent? Amy Baker, Ph.D, a researcher and author, explains parental alienation.

https://www.cbsnews.com/video/psychological-manipulation-an-expert-explains-parental-alienation-to-48-hours/

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RECOVERY

Love Always Wins

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RECOVERY

Admission

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THERAPY

The Mouse in the Room

Clients with internalizing disorders, such as depression or anxiety, may be especially prone to resistance that goes unnoticed by their therapists. These clients may be inhibited in their interpersonal style and reluctant to overtly challenge or confront their treaters (Hill, Thompson, Cogar, & Denman, 1993; Lynch, Seretis, & Hempel, 2016). Rather than make it an “elephant in the room”, internalizing clients often hide their disagreement or even claim to be on board with a therapist’s recommendations (Muran, Eubanks-Carter, & Safran, 2010). However, resistance in this population may still be apparent through covert acts such as statements that distance the therapist, avoidance of certain topics, or physical withdrawal (Ackerman & Hilsenroth, 2001; Hill et al., 1993). Therapists must be highly attuned to even subtle signs of such resistance in order to effectively address it and enhance collaboration.